Part 2: Black Anger and The Nate Parker conundrum

I was just talking about this to an owner at a local bookstore that I patronize, and he told me he was repulsed by Nate Parker’s past, and refuses to support him. I told the owner that I may disagree with his shady past, but I feel that the movie he is promoting is important for the black community. Many people are mixed on this situation, but if I knew the skeletons of everyones hands I’ve placed money into, I would be the most frugal man on Earth.

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Not soon after I finished my last blog post, the Milwaukee incident happened, Cam Newton says we as a nation are past racism, Nate Parker’s murky past got brought up, and United States of America kicked ass in the olympics. So let’s divulge into the topic of race in America and the Nate Parker situation.

 

The Milwaukee Incident 

 

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After reading of the Milwaukee incident that involved the shooting of an armed young black man, burning down of businesses, and vehicles, I have came to the conclusion that I have no idea what actually transpired. I will only go by the facts. Shit went down, and it got ugly. From what I understand is that there were maybe 100 people behind the calamity. The man who was murdered was allegedly armed, and was shot by a black officer who also happened to be a high school class mate of Sylville Smith. Several acts of arson were committed, and 4 officers suffered injuries.

Tensions High In Milwaukee Night After Police Shooting Of Armed Suspect Sparks Violence In City
MILWAUKEE, WI – AUGUST 14: Police officers stand guard as crowds gather for a second night near the BP gas station that was burned after an officer-involved killing August 14, 2016 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Protestors threw rocks and there was gunfire in the crowd as hundreds of people confronted police after an officer shot and killed a fleeing armed man earlier in the day. (Photo by Darren Hauck/Getty Images)

 

Here is the issue, the black community and the police have a real animosity that stems as far back as law enforcement have been in business. The cops have a distrust among inner-city urban minorities, specifically black, because of the poverty and crimes that happen in our community. The urban youths, primarily black, have an issue with law enforcement because they are usually taking someone to jail for an indefinite amount of time. Police brutality has always been ingrained in the black community, this phenomena is nothing new. However, because there is massive amounts of technology available, anyone can be videotaped at any moment with a cell phone. The officer fears for his life when he enters these neighborhoods, because he finds most black criminals have that certain “look”. This look is often glamorized in hip-hop videos by rap artists. The influence by these entertainers  become the trendy look in the poor neighborhoods. Dark skin and a popular hairstyle, such as cornrows, can be misinterpreted as an association with a gang. The cop automatically correlates this ‘look’ with violence and tyranny. The Milwaukee police officer, a black man, had possibly feared for his life and did what he felt was necessary. The body cam footage is not openly available to the public and it is impossible to know what really went down. The black anger that invoked a group of several dozen people to commit these crimes can be attributed to the sour relationship of a segregated city, where the poor and black feel invisible when it comes to justice.  As recent as 2014, Dontre Hamilton, a mentally-ill black man, was murdered by Milwaukee police. This incident caused outrage as the officer was let go, but not charged for the murder. No one can justify the arsons of  the businesses in the community that they live in, but unfortunately this is an issue that will not resolve overnight.

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Another thing is….Why in the hell do media outlets always go to THIS guy when it comes to riots and civil unrest?

I mean, really??….

 

CAM NEWTON

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Cam Newton, quarterback of the Carolina Panthers, had this interview with GQ that I read earlier this week. From what I interpreted in this interview was that he didn’t want to talk about anything too political. If he believes that racism is something that we are beyond, and he is serious, than I would have to disagree. When you make it to a point in life where you make a certain amount of money from endorsements and contracts, you rise to a different tax bracket. Money no longer becomes an object, and people treat you differently. When you have money, and you live in a white neighborhood with friendly neighbors, when you have the god-given athleticism and mental acuity to perform at an MVP level, when you become the face of a city and people of all races revere you in an almost god-like perversity, it is hard to believe that racism actually exists. You start to become like O.J. Simpson, a handsome face, with a docile, friendly personality that major brands can attach their names to. Stepping out of the box may cost you endorsement money, and or fines from his league. Being Muhammad Ali, isn’t politically correct nowadays. It is easier to be Wilt Chamberlain than Muhammad Ali. I am reading a book called “40 million dollar Slaves” that delves into the topic even  more so. The label on the cover of the book is extreme, because no wealthy athlete can honestly be compared to a slave, but  the author exposes the reality of many black athletes disassociating themselves from the black community.

NATE PARKER

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As of lately, all of the talk on social media has been about Nate Parker. Parker, 36, producer of the film “Birth of a Nation”, is under fire for a 1999 case that involved the rape of a woman, which he legally got acquitted of while on a wrestling scholarship at Penn State. The report that I have read — which had court documents of testimony –was really murky. I cannot defend a man or his actions, for I do not know what happened. I will not condemn Nate Parker for having a shady past, because he was acquitted by a jury. However, the court documents are disgusting to read. I couldn’t help but cringe.  What I do feel is that this plan of digging up his skeletons is a deliberate plot by some unnamed force. I have seen an article written by a feminist that ripped him into shreds, witnesses who’ve participated in the actual trial defend him on social media, and liberal outlets bring up his reluctance to play a homosexual character on film. Law is a very technical, yet political entity. Everyone who gets acquitted isn’t innocent, and the opposite is true also. The alleged victim committed suicide in 2012, and another person involved with the case is also a co-producer of the “Birth of a nation” film. I was just talking about this to an owner at a local bookstore that I patronize, and he told me he was repulsed by Nate Parker’s past, and refuses to support him. I told the owner that I may disagree with his shady past, but I feel that the movie he is promoting is important for the black community. Many people are mixed on this situation, but if I knew the skeletons of everyones hands I’ve placed money into, I would be the most frugal man on Earth. Roman Polanski, filmmaker, was infamous for a rape case involving a minor sometime in the 70’s. Woody Allen, screenwriter and actor, had sexual abuse allegations against him as well. Not to make light of these situations, but this goes to show you that it was filmmakers who were placed in situations similar to Nate Parker.

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I still believe that the movie will be released. If the movie does get released, I will definitely go and see the movie. Here is a trailer of the movie.

 

8 thoughts on “Part 2: Black Anger and The Nate Parker conundrum

  1. The political leaders are between a rock and a hard place. They would receive massive amounts of backlash for speaking out against police brutality and racial profiling. The police unions would pull away support from candidates and media would hang them. To even consider going to the national force would admit that police departments worldwide are incompetent, and in law you need irrefutable evidence with a fair judge and jury. Recently Judge Olu Stevens of Kentucky was penalized for speaking about the flaw of all white jury members and no minorities. They suspended his license for 90 days. This white supremacy stuff is no joke, they will have a black judge with a white conservative stance do the dirty work to prove there is no racism in the law system, and blame individualiity.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I plan on seeing “Birth of a Nation,” because it is very important for all of us in the Black community to see. To my knowledge, Nate Parker was found not guilty in a court of law – just like O.J. Simpson – so the belief of his presumed guilt, that many seem to hold onto, is a moot issue when it comes to our history.

    You nailed it on the head with this:

    “…when you have the god-given athleticism and mental acuity to perform at an MVP level, when you become the face of a city and people of all races revere you in an almost god-like perversity, it is hard to believe that racism actually exists. You start to become like O.J. Simpson, a handsome face, with a docile, friendly personality that major brands can attach their names to. Stepping out of the box may cost you endorsement money, and or fines from his league. Being Muhammad Ali, isn’t politically correct nowadays. It is easier to be Wilt Chamberlain than Muhammad Ali.”

    Muhammad Ali was a hero. So is Colin Kaepernick, for his decision to remain seated during the “Star-Spangled Banner.”

    Excellent post!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m going to see it too Eddie. October 7th, 2016, I’ll be in somebody’s theater. We cannot continue to allow these red herrings to impact who we support. We also have to decide once and for all, if we trust the justice system, or not. We cannot trust the system when it benefits us, and then socially condemn someone years later for something they were acquitted for.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Didn’t know that about Nate Parker. Yes $40 million dollar slave is a great book. Cam Newton is the New OJ. When Muhammed Ali was about to get deployed, remember OJ did not stand up for him because of his image and brand. Also I have a hard time when Black Actors want us to boycott or do something. I.E. Isaiah Washington last week wanted no blacks to go to work. That may work for a working actor, but what happens when you live paycheck to paycheck? Kind of synonymous with the point you made about black athletes disconnect from reality. This was an amazing article

    Liked by 1 person

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